DKW

DKW is a defunct German car and motorcycle marque. The name derives from Dampf-Kraft-Wagen (English: steam-driven car). In 1916, the Danish engineer Jorgen Skafte Rasmussen founded a factory in Zschopau, Saxony, Germany, to produce steam fittings. In the same year, he attempted to produce a steam-driven car, called the DKW. Although unsuccessful, he made a two-stroke toy engine in 1919, called Des Knaben Wunsch"the boy's desire". He also put a slightly modified version of this engine into a motorcycle and called it Das Kleine Wunder"the little marvel". This was the real beginning of the DKW brand: by the 1930s, DKW was the world's largest motorcycle manufacturer. In 1932, DKW merged with Audi, Horch and Wanderer, to form the Auto Union. Auto Union came under Daimler-Benz ownership in 1957, and was then purchased by the Volkswagen Group in 1964. The last German built DKW car was the F102 which ceased production in 1966. DKW badged cars continued to be built under license in Brazil and Argentina until, respectively, 1967 and 1969. Denmark (i/?d?nm?rk/; Danish: Danmark, pronounced [?dnm?] ( listen)), officially the Kingdom of Denmark (Danish: Kongeriget Danmark, [?ki? ?dnm?] ( listen)), is a sovereign state in Northern Europe, with two additional overseas constituent countries also forming integral parts of

the kingdom; the Faroe Islands in the North Atlantic and Greenland in North America. Denmark proper[b] is the southernmost of the Nordic countries, located southwest of Sweden, with which it is connected by the Oresund Bridge, and south of Norway, and bordered to the south by Germany. The country consists of a large peninsula, Jutland, and many islands, most notably Zealand, Funen, Lolland, Falster and Bornholm, as well as hundreds of minor islands often referred to as the Danish Archipelago. The Kingdom of Denmark is a constitutional monarchy organised in the form of a parliamentary democracy, with its seat of government in the capital city of Copenhagen. The kingdom is unitary, with powers to manage internal affairs being devolved from the central government to Greenland and the Faroe Islands; this polity is referred to as the rigsf?llesskab (the Danish Realm). Denmark proper is the hegemonial area, where judicial, executive, and legislative power reside. The Faroe Islands are defined to be a community of people within the kingdom, and the Greenlandic people are defined as a separate people with the right to self-determination. One of the results of this arrangement is that Denmark became a member of the European Union in 1973, but both Greenland and the Faroe Islands have opted to remain outside of the EU.