Supercross

Supercross is a cycle racing sport involving racing specialized high performance off-road motorcycles on artificially made dirt tracks consisting of steep jumps and obstacles. Professional Supercross contest races are held almost exclusively within professional baseball and football stadiums. Many notable differences exist from regular motocross. Supercross tracks generally have much tighter turns and are more technical than motocross tracks due to the limited space of an indoor arena. The supercross season takes place during the winter and spring months, partially due to more controllable indoor climates involved. The supercross season travels throughout the entire United States, going a different city every weekend for the next race. There are 17 races in the 2011 and 2012 Monster Energy AMA/FIM Supercross schedule. The Supercross Lites riders series is split into two seriesthe East and the West Coast. The Supercross class has one large series where they travel from east to west for the race and even go to Canada for a couple rounds out of the series. Racers only get a month or two off out of the year between the Supercross and the motocross series, Racers endure crazy jumps and obstacles in their Supercross races that they have to endure for a heat race and a main event. Supercross was derived of Motocross. While Motocross and Supercross are similar in many respects, there are significant differences as well. For example, the Supercross races are heavily advertised and televised motorsports events held within major cities. Also supercross tracks are more technical[citation needed], not as fast as motocross but with a much higher difficulty level[citation needed], further adding to the injury risk factor[citation needed]. The sport Supercross is tailored to the TV spectator, as result of widespread television coverage, as its target market. The term "Supercross" was coined as the e ent name for the first organized motocross race that was successfully held inside a stadium in the United States. In 1972, racing promoter Michael Goodwin staged what he called the "Super Bowl of Motocross" inside the Los Angeles Coliseum in Los Angeles, California. This event was won by Marty Tripes at the age of 16. That initial contest featured many of the top Motocross riders of the time. It was such a commercial success that it spawned many imitators, and the term "Supercross" was coined to identify the similar to Motocross stadium cycling events. Modern Supercross races are sanctioned and governed by motorcycle associations, the main series being either the American Motorcyclist Association which is the oldest and most prestigious cycle racing organization (in America), or the Monster Energy series of Supercross Championship events that are in part the work of Clear Channel, who in 2004 contributed expertise in filming on-track gate event competition for Supercross. While growing consistently since the '70s, in the early part of the 21st Century Supercross' popularity really took off. In the United States, Supercross races today are the second most popular form of motorsport[citation needed] (behind NASCAR racing). The American Motorcyclist Association awards three Supercross Championship Champs each year. They are Supercross Champion which until 2006 was referred to as 250 class, Supercross Lites East (which was the 125 East) Champion, and Supercross Lites West Champion. World Supercross Champions are named by other racing organizations around the world. Supercross racing classifications were governed by the displacement of the motorcycle's engine until 2006. In the past, Championships have been awarded in 125cc (also known as "MX2"), 250cc ("MX1"), and 500cc displacement levels (also known as "MX3"). The 250cc Champion has always been generally considered to be the most prestigious.